It is not '600 #06

  • Andrea Cicala Pozzuoli
  • 2013
  • Inv. No. 18.14.04
  • Edition 100 + 2 AP
  • Categories: Concept, Movimento, Still life
Size S
50x50cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Unframed Mounting
 
50x50cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Inglesina frame Mounting
 
50x50cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Mounted under plexiglass Mounting
 
Size M
70x70cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Unframed Mounting
 
70x70cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Mounted under plexiglass Mounting
 
Size L
100x100cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Unframed Mounting
 
100x100cm Dimensions
Digital Print on Fuji paper DP II Technique
Mounted under plexiglass Mounting
 

It is not ’600 is a series of images illustrating the break between the classical and modern worlds. As testified by the works of Baschenis, Caravaggio and Nessoli, the 1600s represent a century in which the still-life genre developed to its fullest, interpreting the feeling of the precariousness of life that swept across Europe following the Thirty Years’ War and the spread of diseases such as the Black Death. However, while in seventeenth-century paintings the characteristic common to all symbolic elements alluding to the theme of transience was fixity, immobility and stagnation, in Pozzuoli’s work dynamism, explosion and power instead predominate, bearing witness to the shift between two extremes: rather than a silent being hiding behind its fears, society has now become unstoppable and uncontrollable, noisy and shattered. The works represent a futuristic still life, as we are in the century of progress, rapidity and consumption. This is why the title is a statement, but also a warning.
Each image is the outcome of a complex process. The scene is initially drawn and made into a sketch defining the materials, colours and proportions. Then it is time for work in the studio, where the static elements such as fruit and vegetables are photographed and the glass is broken separately, capturing each moment of this explosion. Only then is everything mounted and assembled in its final photographic form.
Andrea Pozzuoli showed his artistic talent at an early age, trying his hand at sculpture and painting. He grew up in an artistic environment that offered him countless stimuli, both avant-garde and traditionalist, that oriented him towards new horizons but also attracted him to the values of classicism. Pozzuoli then trained in the visual arts: he attended the State Art Institute in Cantù and completed his studies at the G. Terragni Art High School, where he started to photograph subjects to be transported to canvas. His gradual move towards photography, following in his father’s footsteps, culminated with his enrolment at the Italian Photography Institute (IIF) in Milan, where he experimented with various approaches – from fashion photography to portraiture and still life – to mould his personal artistic vision. In 2010, for the first Italian Photography Festival organized by the AFI – Italian Photography Archive – at the Fondazione Bandera per l’Arte in Busto Arsizio, he was one of the leading figures in the exhibition by students at the IIF, entitled Landscape – Vision from Young Photographers curated by Erminio Annunzi, photographer and teacher of photographic technique at the IIF. The following year he participated in MIA – Milan Image Art Fair, exhibiting at the IIF stand. In 2011 he was also one of the semi-finalists for the Cairo Prize in the photography section. Three years later – in 2014 – he returned to MIA – Milan Image Art Fair, where he had a solo stand in the ‘Proposta MIA’ section, at which he illustrated a subjective and relativistic world through the photographs in the It Is Not ’600 series.